Personal Statement Template For Sixth Form Student

That said, you’ll want to avoid overused opening sentences. Whatever you say, don’t write that you’ve wanted to study your subject since a young age: there’s only so often admissions tutors can read that sentence without risk of mental collapse. Finding a balance is key.

Check obsessively

Don’t assume Word will pick up on every error; if you’re running factory standard ‘American English’, the spellchecker will be letting through all sorts of Zs which should be Ss, for instance.

“A spelling or grammar mistake is the kiss of death to an application,” says Ned Holt, former head of sixth form at Reading School.

And mistakes are often hiding in plain sight as Ken Jenkinson, headmaster of Colchester Royal College, knows well: “This morning, we had a very bright student who spelt his name wrong.”

The advice from both men? “Always have someone proof read it.”

Write like you

Many personal statements end up looking less like a record of your brilliance and more like a written application to work as a human thesaurus. Admissions tutors are looking for substance, and pomposity won’t do anything to convince them you love their subject.

The personal statements that don’t do well, says Alan Bird, head of sixth form at Brighton College, are those which “lack genuine personal flavour”. Start telling your universities why you’re so keen to study and why you’ll be the best student since Hermione.

And never simply say you’re right for the course – it’s your job to demonstrate that by being specific. Whatever you write needs to be intrinsically you, which is something easy to lose while rattling off achievements.

Make everything count

Universities are looking for someone interested in the course and someone interesting to teach it to. Cut the small talk and press home why what you’re saying is relevant.

Alan Bird sees too many lists which say nothing: “Students might name a book and then give it a review – I could read that off the dust jacket.”

Remember that anything extra-curricular is padding, albeit the good kind, and needs to be spun the right way. “Charity work or being captain of a sports team is very positive and can be great as part of a statement – but make sure whatever you include has relevance to what you are applying for,” says Alan Carlile.

The University of Manchester’s head of widening participation, Julian Skyrme, encourages taking a straightforward approach: “We’re asking ‘why does your part-time job relate to you being an engineer?’ Nail your experience to the course. Personal statements can sometimes appear like a biography.”

You’re good but you’re not that good

After flicking through 30,000 admissions, a little modesty is likely to go down better than a literary rendition of Simply the Best.

“Confidence is great, veering into egotism is not,” says Alan Carlile.

Remember you’re applying to study something new. Your statement should convince universities that you’re excited to engage with new experiences based on your past experiences. Bragging about your achievements just won’t do this.

Helpful links

Ten most overused opening sentences

Ucas guide to the personal statement

UCAS: Dos and don't s (external)

Durham University guide: How to write an effective personal statement (external)

Studential: Writing a personal statement (external)

David Ellis is editor of studentmoneysaver.co.uk

Sixth Form Personal Statement

I attend xxxxxxxxxxxxxx School. I am currently studying a range of GCSE's including Maths, English Language and Literature, Double Science, French, Geography, IT and Food Technology. I enjoy IT and Food Technology because I find them interesting to learn. My favourite subject is English as I enjoy reading, writing, using a wide range of vocabulary and evaluating characters from novels

I have been a member of the girls' basketball team. I completed my work experience in a shoe shop and gained various skills including how to deal with difficult customers and learned how to communicate with customers which helped me for the future

I like reading, watching films, listening to music, playing basketball and socialising with friends and family. My friends and family say I am a pleasant, kind, caring, considerate and quiet person. I would say other people see me as a kind, friendly, respectful and down to earth person

I intend to go onto college after finishing school and study A levels

I would like to take English Language, Economics, Law and History. I would like to become a lawyer. I understand that there are different areas a lawyer can work in and I am not sure of the type of lawyer I want to become. I would like to legally represent people and help them with problems they have. I am a tolerant, hardworking, polite and friendly person.


Article by TSR Community on Tuesday 03 October 2017

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